Gastric Sleeve 2018-02-09T04:28:03+00:00

Gastric Sleeve Surgery | Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy

In gastric sleeve surgery, also called vertical sleeve gastrectomy, a surgeon removes most of your stomach, leaving only a banana-shaped section that is closed with staples. Like gastric band surgery, this surgery reduces the amount of food that can fit in your stomach, making you feel full sooner. Taking out part of your stomach may also affect gut hormones or other factors such as gut bacteria that may affect appetite and metabolism. This type of surgery cannot be reversed because some of the stomach is permanently removed.

Gastric Sleeve Surgery | Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy

VSG surgery restricts food intake and decreases the amount of food used. Most of the stomach is removed during this surgery, which may decrease ghrelin, a hormone that prompts appetite. Lower amounts of ghrelin may reduce hunger more than other purely restrictive surgeries, such as AGB.

VSG has been performed in the past mainly as the first stage of BPD-DS (discussed earlier) in patients who may be at high risk for problems from more extensive types of surgery. These patients’ high risk levels are due to body weight or medical issues. However, more recent research indicates that some patients who have VSG can lose a lot of weight with VSG alone and avoid a second procedure. Researchers do not yet know how many patients who have VSG alone will need a second stage procedure.

Health Benefits of Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric procedures are considered major surgery, and you must consider the risks and long-term health benefits. Bariatric surgery may help you reduce or eliminate some diseases such as in the table below:

Table: Health Improvements After Gastric Bypass Surgery*

Health Problem (Comorbidity)Result After Gastric Bypass Surgery
Type 2 Diabetes– Resolved in 83.7% of patients.
High Blood Pressure– Resolved in 67.5% of patients
High Cholesterol– Improved in 94.9% of patients
Obstructive Sleep Apnea– Resolved in 80.4% of patients
Acid Reflux/GERD– Resolved in 98% of patients
Depression– Improved in 47% of patients
Osteoarthritis and Joint Pain– Resolved in 41% of patients
Stress Urinary Incontinence– Resolved in 44% of patients

 

 In medical terminology, “resolved” is defined as removing all known symptoms and signs of the condition or disease.
 In medical terminology, “improved” is defined as reducing the known symptoms and signs of the condition or disease.

*Results may not represent typical surgical outcomes. Every surgery and each patient undergoing bariatric surgery represents unique sets of circumstances and, therefore, results will vary.

To read more about the benefits of weight-loss surgery, visit the Weight-control Information Network (WIN) website, a national information service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is the Federal Government’s lead agency responsible for biomedical research on nutrition and obesity.

References

1. Inge TH‚ Krebs NF‚ Garcia VF‚ et al. Bariatric surgery for severely overweight adolescents: concerns and recommendations. Pediatrics. 2004 Jul;114(1):217–23.

2. Wilson ST‚ Thomas HI‚ Randall SB. Bariatric surgery in adolescents: recent national trends in use and in-hospital outcome. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. 2007;161(3):217–221.


*Results may not represent typical surgical outcomes. Every surgery and each patient undergoing bariatric surgery represents unique sets of circumstances and, therefore, results will vary.

This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts. The NIDDK would like to thank: Walter Pories, M.D.‚ FACS‚ Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University; Thomas Inge‚ M.D.‚ Ph.D.‚ FACS‚ FAAP‚ Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

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